You are currently browsing the monthly archive for September 2010.

I’m just going to say this once. If he-who-must-not-be-named had returned my first two Harry Potter books, then my Harry Potter set as a whole would share similar print edition information on the title page verso, and yes, as a Library and Information Science professor, having a set in its original entirety matters a great deal. Not having a full set is a material reminder of he-who-must-not-be-named; the otherwise reconciled losses of that relationship are literally inscribed upon my books.

People are SPEAKING LOUDLY in the YA Lit world. Check out what’s going on re: author Laurie Halse Anderson’s award-winning novel, Speak, and how authors, editors, academics, etc., are responding:

Dr. Phil Nel writes,

Wesley Scroggins, Associate Professor of Management at Missouri State University, thinks that Laurie Halse Anderson‘s Speak(1999) is “soft pornography.”  Having read and taught Speak many times, I suspect that Mr. Scroggins either lacks some basic literary skills (such as how to detect tone) or is in need of psychological counseling. As an English professor, I’m not qualified to help with the latter, but I can help him with the former.  So, Dr. Scroggins, I’m dedicating this blog post to you.

Read Phil’s entire post here: http://www.philnel.com/2010/09/20/speaking-out/

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Editors: Jamie Campbell Naidoo, Ph.D. and Sarah Park, Ph.D.

Tentative Title: Sliding Doors in a Pluralistic Society: Critical Approaches to and Intercultural Perspectives on Diversity in Contemporary Literature for Children and Young Adults

Publisher: ALA Editions

Youth deserve to encounter authentic and accurate representations of their cultures in books, libraries, and classrooms. Twenty-first century librarians and educators can be poised to meet the informational, recreational, and cultural needs of youth by providing high-quality children’s and young adult literature and literacy activities that reflect the culturally pluralistic society of the United States.

For our edited volume, we seek chapters that address the growing demands of school media specialists, public youth librarians, classroom teachers, and other educators for information on selecting materials and creating literacy and library programs to meet the needs of children and young adults in our culturally pluralistic society. We define diversity not only in terms of race and culture, but also in age, ability, religious preferences, family composition, and so on. By providing new critical and intercultural approaches to diversity in contemporary literature for children and young adults, this book will provide theoretical frameworks that consider the over-arching issues which continue to expand and break boundaries in youth literature. These approaches can assist librarians and other educators in choosing, evaluating, and selecting quality children’s and YA literature and using it to meet the literacy (informational, reading, cultural, etc.) needs of the increasingly diverse youth population in U.S libraries, classrooms, and homes. As well, the critical and intercultural approaches can help educators situate the books in their socio-political contexts in order to consider how the books may meet the social needs of youth. Finally, the title will provide ideas and examples of successful library and literacy programs that incorporate diverse children’s literature to meet the informational and recreational needs of all children and young adults.

We seek current and timely chapters on the following topics (each bullet represents a separate chapter):

  • Literature review of studies from various disciplines related to the topics of cultural diversity, cultural pluralism, cultural literacy, diversity, etc. as presented in children’s and young adult literature.
  • Understanding the politics and key concerns in selecting, analyzing, and using diverse literature for children and young adults.
  • Creating a working conceptualization of diversity that can be used with children and young adults to foster intercultural understanding and prepare young minds for interacting in the culturally pluralistic society of the U.S.
  • Critical Perspectives in Contemporary Children’s and Young Adult Literature Representing African American People and Cultures.
  • Critical Perspectives in Contemporary Children’s and Young Adult Literature Representing Latino People and Cultures
  • Critical Perspectives in Contemporary Children’s and Young Adult Literature Representing Asian American People and Cultures
  • Critical Perspectives in Contemporary Children’s and Young Adult Literature Representing Indigenous People and Cultures
  • Critical Perspectives in Contemporary Children’s and Young Adult Literature Representing Multiracial or Transnational Youth
  • Critical Perspectives in Contemporary Children’s and Young Adult Literature Describing Characters with Cognitive Dis/Abilities
  • Critical Perspectives in Contemporary Children’s and Young Adult Literature Describing Characters with Physical Dis/Abilities
  • Critical Perspectives in Contemporary Children’s and Young Adult Literature Representing Religious Affiliations.
  • Critical Perspectives in Contemporary Young Adult Literature Depicting Incarcerated Youth
  • Critical Perspectives in Contemporary Children’s and Young Adult Literature Depicting Homelessness
  • Critical Perspectives in Contemporary Children’s and Young Adult Literature Describing Transnational Adoptions
  • Critical Perspectives in Contemporary Children’s Books Depicting Gender Variance and Queer Families and Characters

Other Guidelines: Each chapter must be under 4,000 words, inclusive of all bibliographies and notes. The author(s) should include information about selecting books representing the cultural group, descriptions of “good” and “bad” books, and programming ideas/ strategies that have been tested with children and young adults in classroom and library settings. Chapters should be formatted according the Chicago Manual of Style.

Deadlines: If you are interested in contributing to this edited work, please send a proposal (approximately 500 words) by November 1, 2010, which outlines how you would address the topics in one of the aforementioned chapters. Proposals should include your name, affiliation, email, and phone number along with a current 2-page CV highlighting relevant publications related to your chapter. We will notify selected authors of our decisions by November 15, 2010.  Completed chapters are due by May 30, 2011.

Please send proposals by November 1st to slidingdoors9@gmail.com with “Chapter Proposal” in the subject heading.

Questions? Contact us at slidingdoors9@gmail.com.

The Migration Information Source just released a report on Korean Immigrants in the United States.

Some notable findings:

And a notable absence:

  • Not a single mention of whether or not, and how, transnationally adopted Koreans fit into this picture.

I’m interested in this not only because I’m a Korean American immigrant and therefore one body counted in this data, but also because of how it affects and reflects both my personal and professional lives.

Most of my family members are small business owners and have struggled to get, maintain, and use health insurance. More than 1 in 4? That’s a frightening ratio. What the data doesn’t tell you is the actual or estimated physical/medical/mental health needs of said Korean diaspora, and the rate at which we can/not access the necessary resources.

If more than half of Korean immigrants have a bachelor’s degree or higher, what does that mean for our attitudes towards education, libraries, our children’s education, etc? Are we now working in careers that are commensurate with our degrees, expertise, skills? Earning salaries that are on par with our non-Korean immigrant colleagues? And then those 251,000 children – what kind of library services, school media resources, children’s and young adult literature will they need?

And finally, do the Migration Information Source and US Census count transnationally adopted Koreans? Or are they categorized, counted, and analyzed elsewhere? And if so… where? And why?

The 32nd Annual International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts

Theme: The Fantastic Ridiculous

Division of Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Art

Guest of Honor:  Connie Willis

Guest of Honor: Terry Bisson

Guest Scholar:  Andrea Hairston

Special Guest Emeritis:  Brian Aldiss

The 2011 ICFA welcomes paper proposals on all areas of the fantastic (including high fantasy, allegory, science fiction, horror, folk tales and other traditional literatures, magical realism, the supernatural, and the gothic) in all media (novels, short stories, drama, television, comic books, film, and others).

The Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Art division accepts critical scholarship papers that focus on literature aimed at younger readers. This includes picture books as well as middle-grade and young adult novels, short stories, and graphic novels that involve fantasy, horror, paranormal romance, science fiction, and any other aspect of the fantastic.  We embrace a wide variety of scholarly approaches and interests, including genre, historical, theoretical, and textual models.  We encourage work from institutionally-affiliated scholars, independent scholars, international scholars who work in languages other than English, and graduate students.

The conference will run March 16-20, 2011, in Orlando, Florida.

Please submit a proposal that includes a 250-word abstract and bibliography directly to the division head, Amie Rose Rotruck, at arotruck@gmail.com.  Abstracts should be turned in by October 31, 2010.

The conference encourages graduate student participation and gives an award for outstanding paper by a graduate student each year.

For more information on the conference or other divisions, please visit www.iafa.org.

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