LIS 7210 Library Materials for Children

Instructor Dr. Sarah Park Dahlen
2016 Fall
St. Catherine University
Master of Library and Information Science Program

Course Description

Selection, evaluation and use of media for children in elementary schools and public libraries. Materials in curricular areas are studied along with an examination of the relationships of materials to developmental characteristics and individual differences of the child, to curriculum and recreation, to the exceptional child and to a multicultural society. 3 cr.

Reading/Viewing List (as of May 2, 2016)

  1. Alexander, Kwame. Booked
  2. Atinuke. Illustrated by Lauren Tobia. Anna Hibiscus. 
  3. Bascomb, Neal. Nazi Hunters
  4. Bell, CeCe (written and illustrated). El Deafo
  5. Bradley, Kimberly Brubaker. The War That Saved My Life (print or audio)
  6. Carroll, Lewis. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (any edition, version, etc).
  7. Coy, John. Photographs by Wing Young Huie. Their Great Gift
  8. de la Peña, Matt. Illustrated by Christian Robinson. Last Stop on Market Street
  9. Diggs, Taye. Illustrated by Shane Evans. Mixed Me!
  10. Dr. Seuss (written and illustrated). Horton Hears a Who
  11. Draper, Sharon. Out of My Mind
  12. Edwards, Sue Bradford and Duchess Harris. Black Lives Matter (Special Reports)
  13. Elliott, Zetta. Illustrated by Charity Russell. Let the Faithful Come
  14. Engle, Margarita. Illustrated by Edel Rodriguez. Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings: A Memoir
  15. Erdrich, Louise (written and illustrated). The Birchbark House
  16. Frozen (the movie)
  17. Harris, Robie. Illustrated by Michael Emberly. It’s Perfectly Normal: A Book About Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health
  18. Gino, Alex. George
  19. Jung, Mike. Unidentified Suburban Object
  20. Kent, Rose. Kimchi & Calamari
  21. Kibuishi, Kazu (written and illustrated) Amulet: The Stonekeeper
  22. Levy, Dana Alison. The Misadventures of the Family Fletcher
  23. Lin, Grace. Where the Mountain Meets the Moon
  24. Lindgren, Astrid. Pippi Longstocking (any edition, version, etc.)
  25. Lovelace, Maud Hart. Illustrated by Lois Lenski. Betsy-Tacy (book 1)
  26. Milton, Stephanie, Paul Soares Jr., and Jordan Maron. Minecraft: Essential Handbook
  27. Morales, Yuyi (written and illustrated). Just a Minute: A Trickster Tale and Counting Book
  28. Oppenheim, Joanne. Dear Miss Breed: True Stories of the Japanese American Incarceration During World War II and a Librarian Who Made a Difference
  29. Rowling, J.K. Illustrated by Mary GrandPré. Harry Potter and the Sorceror’s Stone
  30. Sendak, Maurice (written and illustrated). Where the Wild Things Are
  31. Smith, Cynthia Leitich. Illustrated by Cornelius Van Wright and Ying-Hwa Hu. Jingle Dancer
  32. Sweet, Melissa (written and illustrated). Balloons Over Broadway
  33. Tate, Don (written and illustrated). Poet: The Remarkable Story of George Moses Horton
  34. Telgemeier, Raina (written and illustrated). Smile
  35. Tingle, Tim. How I Became a Ghost
  36. Tonatiuh, Duncan (written and illustrated). Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras
  37. White, E.B. Illustrated by Garth Williams Charlotte’s Web
  38. Willems, Mo. Any picture book
  39. Williams-Garcia, Rita. One Crazy Summer
  40. Woodson, Jacqueline. Brown Girl Dreaming
  41. Yang, Gene Luen and Mike Holmes. Secret Coders books 1 and 2 Paths and Portals
  42. Yee, Lisa. Wonder Woman at Super Hero High
  43. Yoo, Paula. Illustrated by Shirley Ng-Benitez. Lily’s New Home
  44. Any American Girl book
  45. Any book from this list: http://www.advocate.com/books/2016/1/29/21-lgbt-picture-books-every-kid-should-read
  46. Any movie from this list: https://www.commonsensemedia.org/lists/50-movies-all-kids-should-watch-before-theyre-12

Required Textbooks

  1. Bang, Molly. (2000). Picture This! How Pictures Work. Chronicle Books.
  2. Horning, Kathleen T. (2010). From Cover to Cover: Evaluating and Reviewing Children’s Books. HarperCollins.

Readings and Assignments for the First Two Weeks of Class

Week 1 ~ Sept 13 ~ Introduction & Publishing

Guest speaker: We will meet at 6:00 pm in CdC 17 for class and then attend the Zetta Elliott panel “Inclusivity and Indie Authors: The Case for Community-Based Publishing” at 7:00 pm. Location TBD.

Readings

  1. ALSC Education Committee. (2015). Competencies for Librarians Serving Children in Public Libraries.
    http://www.ala.org/alsc/edcareeers/alsccorecomps
  2. From Cover to Cover. Introduction and Chapter 1 “A Critical Approach to Children’s Books”
  3. Elliott, Zetta. (2009 September 5). Something Like an Open Letter to the Children’s Publishing Industry. Zetta Elliott Blog.
    – http://zettaelliott.wordpress.com/2009/09/05/something-like-an-open-letter-to-the-children%E2%80%99s-publishing-industry/
  4. Atkins, Laura. (2010). White Privilege and Children’s Publishing: A Web 2.0 Case Study. Write4Children 1(2). Winchester University Press.
    https://sites.google.com/site/tockla/
  5. Elliott, Zetta. (2011 May 25). “Breaking Down Doors: My Self Publishing Story.” Huffington Post.
    – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/zetta-elliott/breaking-down-doors-my-se_b_473336.html
  6. Low, Jason. (2016 January 26). “Where is the Diversity in Publishing? The 2015 Diversity Baseline Survey Results.”
    – http://blog.leeandlow.com/2016/01/26/where-is-the-diversity-in-publishing-the-2015-diversity-baseline-survey-results/
  7. Elliott, Zetta. (2016 February 1). “How It Feels to be Self Published Me.” Publishers Weekly.
    http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/authors/pw-select/article/69205-how-it-feels-to-be-self-published-me.html
  8. Elliott. (2016 April 5). “What’s LOVE Got To Do With It? Self-Publishing as a Black Feminist Act of Radical Self-Care.” Huffington Post Books.
    – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/zetta-elliott/whats-love-got-to-do-with_12_b_9616286.html

Picture Books

  1. Elliott, Zetta. Let the Faithful Come.
  2. Any other book(s) by Zetta Elliott – read and bring to class.

Novels

  1. White, E.B. Charlotte’s Web
    – Garth Williams in the Kerlan Collection: http://special.lib.umn.edu/findaid/xml/CLRC-1656.xml

Assignments Due

D2L Discussion board – Introduce yourself to the class by Monday, September 12. Share 1) what your interest is in taking the class, 2) what you hope to get out of it. Refer to the ALSC competencies, when necessary.

Week 2 ~ Sept 20 ~ Publishing & Classics

Readings

  1. From Cover to Cover. Chapter 3 “Traditional Literature” and chapter 5 “Picture Books”
  2. Bang, Molly. Picture This! How Pictures Work (all)
  3. Nodelman, Perry. (1992). The Other: Orientalism, Colonialism, and Children’s Literature. Children’s Literature Association Quarterly 17, 29-35.

Novels

  1. Carroll, Lewis. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
  2. Lindgren, Astrid. Pippi Longstocking

Picture Books

  1. Sweet, Melissa. Balloons Over Broadway
    – UMN CLRC online exhibit: http://gallery.lib.umn.edu/exhibits/show/balloons-over-broadway
  2. Sendak, Maurice. Where the Wild Things Are
    – Maurice Sendak in the Kerlan Collection:  http://special.lib.umn.edu/findaid/xml/CLRC-69.xml
1507-0For the past several years my students and I have been compiling lists of Asian American children’s and YA literature for the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association (APALATalk Story website (specifically, the APA booklist). This year, one of my students went to town and found hundreds of titles. (Our lists may be comparable to what the CCBC compiles – we need to double check).

A quick glance at our updated lists (not yet published to Talk Story) reveal the following:

  1. We could not find a single YA text with a Taiwanese or Laotian protagonist.
  2. White people love writing about Japan.
  3. Hold the folktales – unless you’re Asian. Then keep ’em coming.
  4. Non-adopted people still love writing about adopted Asians.
  5. We get it, we get it. Asian immigrant children struggle to speak English and are fantastic ambassadors of our cultures.
  6. We need a LOT more books with Thai, Mongolian, Malaysian, Burma/Myanmar, Filipino, and Tibetan characters.
  7. We also need a LOT more books set in Asian-inspired fantasy worlds. Let’s thank our lucky stars for Ellen Oh.

This is not an invitation to merely insert an Asian character into your text (see here and here). This is a CALL TO ACTION for Asian American authors and illustrators, and for all agents and editors and publishers and librarians and teachers and parents and caregivers and readers and scholars.

#WeNeedDiverseBooks AND #WeNeedDiverseAuthors

Day of Diversity: MN Edition
co-sponsored by CYP and DORT
Minnesota Library Association | October 9, 2015

Adichie, Chimamanda. (2009 October 7). “The Danger of a Single Story.” Ted Talks. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9Ihs241zeg

Bluemle, Elizabeth. shelftalker – https://www.librarything.com/catalog/shelftalker

The Brown Bookshelf – http://thebrownbookshelf.com

Bruce, Allie Jane. (2015 Fall). “On Being White.” Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to Children 13(3), 3-6.

CBC Diversity – http://www.cbcdiversity.com

De Colores: The Raza Experience in Books for Children – http://decoloresreviews.blogspot.com

Derman-Sparks, Louise. (2013) “An Updated Guide for Selecting Anti-Bias Children’s Books.” Teaching for Change. – http://www.tfcbooks.org/2013-guide-anti-bias-childrens-books

Derman-Sparks, Louise and Patricia G. Ramsey. (2002). “What If All the Kids are White? Multicultural/Anti-Bias Education with White Children.” Teaching for Change. http://www.teachingforchange.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/ec_whatifallthekids_english.pdf

Día: Day of Diversity resources (2015 January) – http://dia.ala.org/dayofdiversity

Horning, Kathleen T. (2014 May 1). “Children’s Books: Still an All-White World?” School Library Journal. http://www.slj.com/2014/05/diversity/childrens-books-still-an-all-white-world/

Koester, Amy. “Selection is Privilege.” The Show Me Librarian blog. http://showmelibrarian.blogspot.com/2015/02/selection-is-privilege.html

Larrick, Nancy. (1965). “The All White World of Children’s Literature.” Saturday Review, 63-65.

Lo, Malinda. (2015 February). “Perceptions of Diversity in Book Reviews.” Diversity in YAhttp://www.diversityinya.com/2015/02/perceptions-of-diversity-in-book-reviews/

Lonial, Amita. (2015 Sept 23). “My Turn: Challenging Ourselves to Talk About Race.” Illinois Library Association: Because Libraries Matter 33(5). https://www.ila.org/publications/ila-reporter/article/17/my-turn-challenging-ourselves-to-talk-about-race

Low, Jason. (2013 June). “Why Hasn’t the Number of Multicultural Books Increased in Eighteen Years?” Lee & Low blog.  http://blog.leeandlow.com/2013/06/17/why-hasnt-the-number-of-multicultural-books-increased-in-eighteen-years/

McIntosh, Peggy. (1988). “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack.” White Privilege and Male Privilege: A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences Through Work on Women’s Studies. – http://ted.coe.wayne.edu/ele3600/mcintosh.html

Pinkney, Andrea Davis. (2014 May 3.) “Rejoice the Legacy.” May Hill Arbuthnot Lecture at the UMN Children’s Literature Research Collections.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LC5y1RTGEZQ&feature=youtu.be

Reading While White blog – http://readingwhilewhite.blogspot.com

Reese, Debbie. American Indians in Children’s Literature blog. http://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com

Talk Story Together – http://talkstorytogether.org

Teaching for Change – http://www.teachingforchange.org

Teaching Tolerance – http://www.tolerance.org

Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy.  https://teachinglatinamericathroughliterature.wordpress.com/2015/08/14/en-la-clase-our-go-to-places-for-quality-multicultural-resources/

We Need Diverse Books – http://weneeddiversebooks.org

Winkler, E. N. (2009). “Children are Not Colorblind: How Young Children Learn Race.” PACE: Practical Approaches for Continuing Education. HighReach Learning, 3(3), 1-8.  https://www.academia.edu/3094721/Children_Are_Not_Colorblind_How_Young_Children_Learn_Race

Compiled by
Sarah Park Dahlen, St. Catherine University
Tami Lee, Ramsey County Library
Joan Trygg, Red Balloon Bookshop
Lisa Von Drasek, UMN Children’s Literature Research Collection and ALSC Day of Diversity Planning Committee
Gretchen Wronka, ALSC Day of Diversity Planning Committee

DayofDiversityMN-handout (PDF)

LIS 7210 Library Materials for Children
Instructor Dr. Sarah Park Dahlen
2015 Fall
St. Catherine University
Master of Library and Information Science Program

Course Description

Selection, evaluation and use of media for children in elementary schools and public libraries. Materials in curricular areas are studied along with an examination of the relationships of materials to developmental characteristics and individual differences of the child, to curriculum and recreation, to the exceptional child and to a multicultural society. 3 cr.

Reading/Viewing List

  1. Alarcón, Francisco X. Illustrated by Maya Christina Gonzalez. Iguanas in the Snow: And Other Winter Poems / Iguanas en la Nieve: Y Otros Poemas de Invierno
  2. Alexander, Kwame. Crossover
  3. Bascomb, Neal. Nazi Hunters
  4. Bell, CeCe. El Deafo
  5. Burnett, Francis Hodgson. The Secret Garden
  6. Chainani, Soman. The School for Good and Evil #1
  7. Coy, John. Hoop Genius
  8. Dr. Seuss. Green Eggs and Ham
  9. Elliott, Zetta. The Phoenix on Barkley Street
  10. Engle, Margarita. The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom
  11. Erdrich, Louise. The Birchbark House
  12. Evans, Shane. Underground: Finding the Light to Freedom
  13. Ewert, Marcus. 10,000 Dresses
  14. Harris, Robie. It’s Perfectly Normal: A Book About Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health
  15. Jimenez, Francisco. The Circuit: Stories from the Life of a Migrant Child
  16. Jung, Mike. Geeks, Girls, and Secret Identities
  17. Kibuishi, Kazu. Amulet: The Stonekeeper
  18. LaRochelle, David. Moo
  19. Levy, Dana Alison. The Misadventures of the Family Fletcher
  20. Lindgren, Astrid. Pippi Longstocking
  21. Lovelace, Maud Hart. Betsy-Tacy (book 1)
  22. Morales, Yuyi. Viva Frida
  23. Oppenheim, Joanne. Dear Miss Breed: True Stories of the Japanese American Incarceration During World War II and a Librarian Who Made a Difference
  24. Richardson, Justin. And Tango Makes Three
  25. Rowling, J.K.  Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  26. Russell, Rachel Renée. Dork Diaries 1: Tales From a Not-So-Fabulous Life
  27. Santat, Dan. The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend
  28. Selznick, Brian. The Marvels
  29. Sendak, Maurice. Where the Wild Things Are
  30. Smith, Cynthia Leitich. Jingle Dancer 
  31. Sweet, Melissa. Balloons Over Broadway: The True Story of the Puppeteer of Macy’s Parade. UMN CLRC online exhibit: http://gallery.lib.umn.edu/exhibits/show/balloons-over-broadway
  32. Telgemeier, Raina. Smile
  33. Tingle, Tim. How I Became a Ghost
  34. Ursu, Anne. The Real Boy
  35. Van Wagenen, Maya. Popular: How a Geek in Pearls Discovered the Secret to Confidence
  36. White, E.B. Charlotte’s Web
  37. Willems, Mo. Any picture book (Elephant and Piggy, Pigeon, Knuffle Bunny, etc.)
  38. Williams-Garcia, Rita. One Crazy Summer
  39. Woodson, Jacqueline. Brown Girl Dreaming
  40. Yang, Gene Luen. Secret Coders
  41. Minecraft (TBD)
  42. Read and bring to class any book(s) in the American Girl series
  43. Read, watch, or listen to any version of Wizard of Oz. Bring your version to class, if possible, and be prepared to discuss.
  44. The Lego Movie
  45. Perrault, Charles. “Little Red Riding Hood” > http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0333.html
  46. Find, read, and bring to class  at least one version of Little Red Riding Hood for children.

Required Textbooks

  1. Keywords for Children’s Literature edited by Philip Nel and Lissa Paul.
  2. Picture This! How Pictures Work by Molly Bang

Readings and Assignments for the First Two Weeks of Class

Week 1 | Sept 15 | Introduction & Publishing

Readings

  • Keywords. 3 Audience; 8 Childhood; 9 Children’s Literature; 13 Culture; 30 Literacy; 36 Picture Book; 42 Reading; 45 Story
  • Bang, Molly. Picture This! How Pictures Work (all)

Novels

  • White, E.B. Charlotte’s Web

Picture Books

Assignments Due

  • Bring in one your favorite picture books and children’s novels from your childhood (two books total). Be prepared to talk about why the books meant something to you and why you still remember them years later.  Pick books that are not on the syllabus.

Week 2 | Sept 22 | Publishing & Classics

Readings

Novels

  • Burnett, Francis Hodgson. The Secret Garden
  • Lindgren, Astrid. Pippi Longstocking

Picture Books

  • Elliott, Zetta. The Phoenix on Barkley Street

(NOTE: The syllabus is heavy on black children’s and YA literature because I revised the course in light of the #BlackLivesMatter movement, and so we could use the concepts learned and discussed through those texts as examples for discussions of related issues in youth lit and social justice. I am fully aware that my reading list is not representative of all social justice issues, but what I hope is that by discussing a narrow segment, my students and I can learn to think broadly in terms of ideology, positionality, authorship, power, privilege, etc as they relate to about social justice and children’s literature.)

LIS 7190 Social Justice and Children’s/YA Literature
Instructor Dr. Sarah Park Dahlen
2015 Summer
St. Catherine University
Master of Library and Information Science Program

Course Description

In this course, students will learn how to select, evaluate and analyze depictions and aspects of social justice and injustice in children’s and young adult literature. We will consider topics such as power, racism, diversity, violence, perspective, publishing trends, authorship, illustrations, and ideology. We will also consider how these texts may be used in library programming. 

By successfully finishing this course, students will be able to select, evaluate, and recommend a variety of materials depicting social justice issues for young audiences.

Required Readings (assigned by me)

  • A Wreath for Emmitt Till by Marilyn Nelson
  • After Tupac & D Foster by Jacqueline Woodson
  • Eighth-Grade Superzero by Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich
  • Monster by Walter Dean Myers
  • A Wish After Midnight by Zetta Elliott
  • Bridge by Patrick Jones
  • Return to Sender by Julia Alvarez
  • Ask Me No Questions by Marina Budhos
  • No Crystal Stair: A Documentary Novel of the Life and Works of Lewis Michaux, Harlem Bookseller by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson
  • If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth
  • Rain is Not My Indian Name by Cynthia Leitich Smith
  • The Real Boy by Anne Ursu 
  • El Deafo by CeCe Bell
  • I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson 
  • Call me Tree/Llámame árbol by Maya Christina Gonzalez
  • Star of the Week by Darlene Friedman
  • The Misadventures of the Family Fletcher by Dana Alison Levy

Additional Required Readings (assigned by students – the Unsyllabus portion)

  • Under a Painted Sky by Stacey Lee
  • The Education of Little Tree by Forrest Carter
  • Boys Without Names by Kashmira Sheth
  • Brooklyn Burning by Steve Brezenoff
  • The Thief Lord by Cornelia Funke
  • The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak

Assignments

  • Text presentation
  • Book talk and flyer
  • Unsyllabus presentation
  • Book discussion group
  • Reflection paper

First Week’s Readings 

WEEK 1 | June 2 Tuesday | #WeNeedDiverseBooks

Readings

  • Larrick, Nancy. (1965). “The All White World of Children’s Literature.” Saturday Review, 63-65. 
  • Horning, Kathleen T. (2014 May 1). “Children’s Books: Still an All-White World?” School Library Journal.
  • Derman-Sparks, Louise. (2013) “An Updated Guide for Selecting Anti-Bias Children’s Books.” Teaching for Change.
  • Diversity in Youth Literature. Editors’ Introduction “Open Books, Open Doors: Cultural Diversity On and Off the Page” (Jamie Campbell Naidoo and Sarah Park Dahlen)
  • Diversity in Youth Literature. Chapter 1 “Voices of Experience: Promoting Acceptance of Other Cultures” (Carol Doll and Kasey Garrison)
  • Diversity in Youth Literature. Chapter 2 “Opening Doors to Understanding: Developing Cultural Competence through Youth Literature” (Eliza Dresang) 

Youth Literature

  • A Wreath for Emmett Till by Marilyn Nelson

WEEK 1 | June 4 Thursday | Occupy Children’s Literature

Readings

Youth Literature

  • After Tupac & D Foster by Jacqueline Woodson
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